Pregnancy Outreach Worker interviews: Shaista

As the Pregnancy Outreach Workers Service comes to an end, we’re reflecting on the last decade by interviewing some of our POWs about their work.

Jacque
Jahanara
Shaista
Shazia
Sophia

Shaista’s story

Shaista’s been here for nine years so she’s a relative newbie!

“POWS used to work out of Children’s Centres, which was a bit isolating, so coming together to work out of the Gateway office a few years ago was the best thing. Being able to work as a team, sharing advice and supporting each other is important for us.

“I’ve worked across Birmingham, with all types of new mums, including teenagers and older mums, and in lots of different communities, from Washwood Heath to Handsworth.

“That’s what I love about the job: we’re out in the community, and anything can happen. But that’s also why POWS are good for pregnant women – because we can go to them.

“It’s all very well making an appointment for someone to visit a Children’s Centre, but it’s not always practical to expect a pregnant woman to travel, especially if they have other young children too. If they’re new to the area they may not be able to remember where to go, or how to get there on public transport, and if finances are an issue, then even bus fares can be prohibitive.

“We are also really accessible. We are there from early on in the pregnancy, because early intervention can be vital. The more that services are cut, the more vulnerable women need someone to help them prepare, and to navigate through what is often a very confusing and admin-heavy time.

“Clients have our phone number and they can call us any time. We can visit families in the evenings if necessary, and we can use our own transport to pick people up and take them to appointments. It’s this sort of flexibility that really sets us apart from other health professionals and helps us to build a more genuine, useful relationship with the women we work with. We’re not turning up in a suit with an official-looking badge, we’re just popping over to give them a bit of support.

“One of the things that has really helped us recently is the ability to use more modern technology in our roles. We all have tablets that we take to each appointment and that means we can help people to fill in forms, bid on council properties, and make appointments there and then. This can be really important for people who don’t have internet access at home, have limited phone credit, or find it hard to talk on the phone, perhaps due to language barriers.”